Echo's Of The Past

Only A Fool Would Say That
Steely Dan / Can't Buy A Thrill

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Steely Dan — Only A Fool Would Say That - 1972

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Chuck Jackson’s 1966 album Tribute to Rhythm and Blues — in which the smooth soul stylist allowed a gruffer side to come to the surface on a set of covers cut live in the studio with his road band — was enough of a success to merit a follow-up, and Tribute to Rhythm and Blues, Vol. 2 followed later the same year. By most accounts, Jackson and his band didn’t have to make another trip to the studio for this to happen, as Vol. 2 was apparently stitched together from material recorded for the first album that didn’t make the cut. These performances hardly sound like leftovers or rejects, though — Jackson’s passionate version of “Sunny” shreds Bobby Hebb’s original, the opening medley is nightclub showmanship at its best, “634-5789” gets a moving romantic undercurrent that sets it apart from Wilson Pickett’s original, and “Blowin’ in the Wind” is as idiosyncratic a Dylan cover as you’ll ever hear. While Bobby Scott’s band may lack some of the polish of the session cats who usually backed Jackson in the studio, they sound tight and committed on these recordings, with the cohesion that comes from playing together on the road for a few years, and Jackson is both comfortable and energized working with them. A great album that, along with the first volume, ranks with the very best music Chuck Jackson ever committed to tape.

1963 Lp The Angels SING TWELVE OF THEIR GREATEST HITS On Ascot 13009. Best Known For Their Smash Hit MY BOYFRIENDS BACK. This Is A Tough One To Find. #1963 #Lp #TheAngels #AngelsSingTwelveOfTheirGreatestHits #AscotRecords #cottonFields #GirlGroup #sixties #rockandroll #Soul #vinyl #vintage #vinylon #vinyling #vinylclub #vinyljunkie #vinylforsale #vinylrevival #vinylcollector #wax #midcentury #realmusic #record #recordclub #recordjunkie #recordrevival #recordsforsale #recordcollector #cratedigger #nowspinning

The Angels’ 1963 number one hit, “My Boyfriend’s Back,” is one of the half-dozen or so archetypal girl group classics. Hand clap beats, sassy vocals, slightly campy lyrics, and an arrangement paced by wailing horns and streetcorner harmonies; it was a surefire hit and one that the group could never live up to, although they continued to record for some time.

 

The Angels had actually been around for a while before “My Boyfriend’s Back,” making the Top 20 in 1961 with the ballad “‘Till,” and the Top 40 with a follow-up, “Cry Baby Cry.” Featuring sisters Barbara and Phyllis Allbut, along with lead singer Linda Jansen, the group was at this time much more inclined toward lush doo-wop, somewhat in the mold of Little Anthony & the Imperials. Jansen left near the end of 1962, to be replaced by Peggy Santiglia, who gave the trio a tougher sound. In 1963, they hooked up with the songwriting/production team of Feldman-Goldstein-Gottehrer (later to oversee the McCoys and the Strangeloves), who penned and produced material more in line with the Spectorian Wall of Sound gracing the airwaves at the peak of the girl group era.

1963 45 Rpm Steve Alaimo I TOLD YOU SO On Checker 1047. #1963 #45Rpm #SteveAlaimo #IToldYouSo #CheckerRecords #Soul #NorthernSoul #rockandroll #vinyl #vintage #vinyling #vinylclub #vinyljunkie #vinylforsale #vinylcollector #wax #sixties #midcentury #record #realmusic #recordclub #recordjunkie #recordcollector #recordsforsale #cratedigger #nowspinning

1966 Lp Sam Cooke THE UNFORGETTABLE SAM COOKE On Rca Victor Lsp 3517. If You Don’t Like Sam Cooke, You Better Check Yourself At The Door! #1966 #Lp #SamCooke #TheUnforgettableSamCooke #rcavictor #IAintGonnaCheatOnYouNoMore #Soul #rhythmandblues #rockandroll #pop #vinyl #vintage #vinylon #vinyling #vinylclub #vinyljunkie #vinylcollector #wax #midcentury #sixties #record #realmusic #recordclub #recordjunkie #recordsforsale #recordcollector #cratedigger #nowspinning

Sam Cooke was the most important soul singer in history — he was also the inventor of soul music, and its most popular and beloved performer in both the black and white communities. Equally important, he was among the first modern black performers and composers to attend to the business side of the music business, and founded both a record label and a publishing company as an extension of his careers as a singer and composer. Yet, those business interests didn’t prevent him from being engaged in topical issues, including the struggle over civil rights, the pitch and intensity of which followed an arc that paralleled Cooke’s emergence as a star — his own career bridged gaps between black and white audiences that few had tried to surmount, much less succeeded at doing, and also between generations; where Chuck Berry or Little Richard brought black and white teenagers together, James Brown sold records to white teenagers and black listeners of all ages, and Muddy Waters got young white folkies and older black transplants from the South onto the same page, Cooke appealed to all of the above, and the parents of those white teenagers as well — yet he never lost his credibility with his core black audience. In a sense, his appeal anticipated that of the Beatles, in breadth and depth.