Echo's Of The Past

1955 45 Rpm Marvin & Johnny AINT THAT RIGHT On Modern 974. Best Known for Their Hit CHERRY PIE! #1955 #45rpm #MarvinAndJohnny #AintThatRight #ModernRecords #DooWop #RhythmAndBlues #rockandroll #rock #vinyl #vintage #vinylclub #VintageVinyl #vinylrocks #vinylrules #vinyladdict #wax #midcentury #record #recordclub #recordsrule #recordaddict #recordcollector #cratedigger #nowspinning

One of the first notable rhythm & blues duos, Marvin & Johnny weren’t so much a permanent act as Marvin Phillips (b. Oct. 23, 1931) and several partners that he would name “Johnny.” Although Emory Perry was the most frequent of these, Phillips also duetted with Jesse Belvin (making number two in the R&B chart, as Jesse & Marvin, with “Dream Girl”), Carl Green, and others, though Phillips called Perry “my main Johnny.” Whoever was singing, Marvin & Johnny were significant, if not major, figures in the transition from West Coast jump blues to hotter sax-driven R&B sides that began to approach rock & roll; they were also forerunners of doo wop with their appealingly grainy harmonies and occasional sly sense of humor. Recording for Specialty and Modern, they had a couple of Top Ten R&B hits, “Baby Doll” (1953) and “Tick Tock”/”Cherry Pie” (1954), and also issued several other strong singles, sometimes in a sort of updated Louis Jordan style. They faded after the mid-’50s, although they would also record for Aladdin and several other small Los Angeles labels.

1949 Headlight Bezels (2) Chrome Has some pitting, no rust holes or dents. For Sale Or Best Offer! #1949 #Oldsmobile #1949Oldsmobile #VintageCarParts #CarPartsForSale #headlightBezels #HotRod #Vintage #Cool #Original

1949 Headlight Bezels (2) Chrome Has some pitting, no rust holes or dents. For Sale Or Best Offer! #1949 #Oldsmobile #1949Oldsmobile #VintageCarParts #CarPartsForSale #headlightBezels #HotRod #Vintage #Cool #Original

1972 45 Rpm Bobby Bland I’M SO TIRED On Duke 477. Amazing Talent! #1972 #45rpm #BobbyBland #ImSoTired #DukeRecords #Soul #Blues #Vinyl #vinylclub #vinylrocks #vinylrules #vinyladdict #wax #record #recordclub #recordsrule #recordaddict #recordcollector #nowspinning #cratedigger

1972 45 Rpm Bobby Bland I’M SO TIRED On Duke 477. Amazing Talent! #1972 #45rpm #BobbyBland #ImSoTired #DukeRecords #Soul #Blues #Vinyl #vinylclub #vinylrocks #vinylrules #vinyladdict #wax #record #recordclub #recordsrule #recordaddict #recordcollector #nowspinning #cratedigger

Bobby Bland earned his enduring blues superstar status the hard way: without a guitar, harmonica, or any other instrument to fall back upon. All Bland had to offer was his magnificent voice, a tremendously powerful instrument in his early heyday, injected with charisma and melisma to spare. Just ask his legion of female fans, who deemed him a sex symbol late into his career.

 

For all his promise, Bland’s musical career ignited slowly. He was a founding member of the Beale Streeters, the fabled Memphis aggregation that also included B.B. King and Johnny Ace. Singles for Chess in 1951 (produced by Sam Phillips) and Modern the next year bombed, but that didn’t stop local DJ David Mattis from cutting Bland on a couple of 1952 singles for his fledgling Duke logo.

 

Bland’s tormented crying style was still pretty rough around the edges before he entered the Army in late 1952. But his progress upon his 1955 return was remarkable; with saxist Bill Harvey’s band (featuring guitarist Roy Gaines and trumpeter Joe Scott) providing sizzling support, Bland’s assured vocal on the swaggering “It’s My Life Baby” sounds like the work of a new man. By now, Duke was headed by hard-boiled Houston entrepreneur Don Robey, who provided top-flight bands for his artists. Scott soon became Bland’s mentor, patiently teaching him the intricacies of phrasing when singing sophisticated fare (by 1962, Bland was credibly crooning “Blue Moon,” a long way from Beale Street).

 

Most of Bland’s savage Texas blues sides during the mid- to late ’50s featured the slashing guitar of Clarence Hollimon, notably “I Smell Trouble,” “I Don’t Believe,” “Don’t Want No Woman,” “You Got Me (Where You Want Me),” and the torrid “Loan a Helping Hand” and “Teach Me (How to Love You).” But the insistent guitar riffs guiding Bland’s first national hit, 1957’s driving “Farther Up the Road,” were contributed by Pat Hare, another vicious picker who would eventually die in prison after murdering his girlfriend and a cop. Later, Wayne Bennett took over on guitar, his elegant fretwork prominent on Bland’s Duke waxings throughout much of the ’60s.

1961 45 Rpm The Jive Five MY TRUE STORY On Beltone 1006. Great Record From A Very Underrated Group. #1961 #45rpm #JiveFive #MyTrueStory #BeltoneRecords #DooWop #DooWopBallad #IDigDooWop #RockAndRoll #Pop #Soul #Wax #vinyl #vinylclub #vinylrocks #vinylrules #vinyladdict #record #recordclub #recordsrule #recordaddict #recordcollector #cratedigger #nowspinning

Best known for the number one R&B hit “My True Story,” the Jive Five were one of the few vocal groups to survive the transition from the ’50s to the ’60s. In the process, they helped move the music itself forward, providing a key link between doo wop and ’60s soul. Formed in Brooklyn, NY, the group originally consisted of Eugene Pitt (lead), Jerome Hanna (tenor), Richard Harris (tenor), Billy Prophet (baritone), and Norman Johnson (bass). the Jive Five’s first hit, “My True Story,” was their biggest, peaking at number one on the R&B charts and number three on the pop charts in the summer of 1961. None of the band’s subsequent singles — including 1962’s minor R&B hit “These Golden Rings” — were as popular, but the group managed to keep performing and recording. Under the direction of Eugene Pitt and Norman Johnson, the Jive Five refashioned themselves as a soul band in 1964, forming a new lineup with Casey Spencer (tenor), Webster Harris (tenor), and Beatrice Best (baritone). This new incarnation of the band signed to United Artists Records. The group only had one hit on UA, 1965’s “I’m a Happy Man.” In 1966, the Jive Five left United Artists and signed with Musicor, where they had the 1968 R&B hit “Sugar (Don’t Take Away My Candy).” They changed labels again in 1970, signing with Decca. That same year, they changed their name to the Jyve Fyve, in order to appear more contemporary. the Jyve Fyve had only one minor R&B hit, 1970’s “I Want You to Be My Baby.” The group continued to perform and record for a variety of small labels during the ’70s, but never had another hit. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s, the only constant member was Eugene Pitt. In 1975, Pitt changed the name of the group to Ebony, Ivory & Jade, but this new incarnation failed to gain much attention. In 1982 Pitt changed the name of the group back to the Jive Five and the band recorded two albums for the indie label Ambient Sound. Across the following decades the Jive Five were regulars on the oldies circuit.